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From Eyesore to Opportunity

Transforming Buildings & Neighborhoods

Recent discussions about the fate of the 120 year-old brewhouse at 13 Cataract Street got us thinking. Those in favor of demolishing the building say it’s an eyesore, beyond repair, and a haven for crime. With peeling paint, missing windows, and holes in the roof, certainly the iconic building has seen better days. And yes, crime does occur around the building; that is not an issue to be taken lightly. But will demolishing the building solve this problem?

If we demolished every “eyesore” in Rochester, would we have solved all the City’s problems? Or might we end up tossing the proverbial baby out with the bath water? Over the next few weeks, we’ll be highlighting some of these former “eyesores” to show that almost any building can be rehabilitated, to demonstrate how this rehab can, in turn, transform a neighborhood, and to remind us all of opportunities that were almost lost.

Station 55
55 Railroad Street

By the time Costanza Enterprises remade this burnt-out structure into Station 55 in 2008/2009, it had already lived many lives. Best known as the home and headquarters of Noah’s Ark Warehouse and later a factory for assembling office furniture and equipment, the building had stood vacant since 2001. $3.5 Million in private investment turned this hopeless eyesore near the Public Market into very popular Soho-style loft apartments and 14,000 sq. ft. of buzzing market space.

Click on the image below to see a side-by-side comparison of the before and after:

From Eyesore to Opportunity 1

 

Here’s a full view of the eyesore before Costanza Enterprises rehabbed it (looks pretty bad, right?) :

From Eyesore to Opportunity 2

 

And here’s the after–an opportunity that could have been lost without vision and substantial investment from Costanza Enterprises. Today the units at Station 55 have a waiting list.

From Eyesore to Opportunity 3

 

Thanks to Christene at Constanza Enterprises for the information and “before” photo. And thanks to Richard Margolis for the “after” photo!

Want to see more “eyesores” that have been turned into economic opportunities and assets for our neighborhoods and city? Visit our Success Stories page to see the full list.

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From Eyesore to Opportunity

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