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2016 Preservation Awards – Special Achievement

The Special Achievement Award recognizes accomplishments that have occurred over a lengthy period of time. This year’s Special Achievement Award will be presented to Thomas X.Grasso, president emeritus of the Canal Society of New York State and commissioner of the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor.

2016 Special Achievement Award recipient, Thomas X. Grasso.

2016 Special Achievement Award recipient, Thomas X. Grasso.

For over three decades, Pittsford resident Tom Grasso has committed his time and talent to the promotion and redevelopment of the historic Erie Canal in New York State.  He is considered a statewide leader in the preservation of the canal and a strong advocate for revitalization efforts of the canal throughout the community.  His strong leadership has brought the World Canal Conference to Rochester twice, during the past decade.  Now retired faculty from the geology department at Monroe Community College, Tom is the author of numerous canal-related publications.  In 2012, the “Thomas X. Grasso Lodge” was dedicated in Greece Canal Park, to honor his many decades of work and advocacy in promoting the canal, often considered the greatest 19th-century engineering project in the United States.

The Landmark Society’s 2016 Annual Preservation Awards ceremony will take place this Sunday, November 13 at 3 PM in Rochester’s historic City Hall, located downtown at 30 Church Street.

2016 Preservation Awards – Paul Malo Award for Community Preservation Advocacy

The Paul Malo Award was established in honor of the late Syracuse University architect, professor, and preservation advocate who was a friend and colleague of The Landmark Society for over four decades. The award recognizes community activists who have done outstanding work in the field of historic preservation.

This year’s Paul Malo Award for Community Preservation Advocacy is awarded to Arlene Wright Vanderlinde and the late Leo Dodd from Historic Brighton.

2016 Paul Malo Award recipient, Arlene Wright Vanderlinde.

2016 Paul Malo Award recipient, Arlene Wright Vanderlinde.

Arlene Wright Vanderlinde and the late Leo Dodd are two individuals whose dedication, work and commitment to the Brighton community have resulted in a wider awareness of and appreciation for its history and built environment.  Long active in historic preservation advocacy, Arlene is a founder of Historic Brighton, the organization that promotes the history and architecture of that community.  Her tireless work includes educational, promotional, and publication projects that have brought attention to these important topics.

 

2016 Paul Malo Award recipient, the late Leo Dodd.

2016 Paul Malo Award recipient, the late Leo Dodd.

The late Leo Dodd, a gifted artist and trustee of Historic Brighton, was its principal researcher, who amassed an impressive archive cataloguing the history of brick manufacturing, the town’s major industry during the 19th century.  “The Bricks of Brighton” project recognizes that legacy, with a publication and recently created town hiking trail. The collective work of these two dedicated individuals, through their programming for Historic Brighton, has increased the visibility of historic preservation in Brighton.

The Landmark Society’s 2016 Annual Preservation Awards ceremony will take place this Sunday, November 13 at 3 PM in Rochester’s historic City Hall, located downtown at 30 Church Street.

2016 Preservation Awards – Historic Home Award

The Landmark Society’s Annual Awards ceremony is less than a week away. Join us on Sunday, November 13 at 3 PM at Rochester’s historic City Hall, 30 Church Street. Awards are given to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, public buildings, historic properties, and landscapes.  This week we continue to introduce this year’s award recipients.

The Historic Home Award is given to owners of private residences for their continued care of and commitment to the preservation of an architecturally significant house over a minimum of seven years.

2016 Historic Home Award recipients - Nicholas & Alice Zumbulyadis, 2 Seneca Parkway.

2016 Historic Home Award recipients – Nicholas & Alice Zumbulyadis, 2 Seneca Parkway.

2 Seneca Parkway
Rochester, New York
Owners:  Nicholas & Alice Zumbulyadis

Located in Rochester’s Maplewood neighborhood, this handsome Tudor Revival style residence was built in 1911, adjacent to Maplewood Park and the Genesee River gorge.  With amenities designed by the renowned Frederick Law Olmsted, the surrounding neighborhood is a designated historic district listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For over 20 years, this house has been the home of Nicholas and Alice Zumbulyadis, who have completed a series of major projects to restore the house to its original appearance. Projects include the restoration of missing moldings and paneling, re-opening access to the original pantry, and fabricating new, historically designed doors for their early 20th-century garage. In completing these projects, the owners are among the first in our region to take advantage of the New York State Homeowner’s Tax Credit program for the rehabilitation of National Register listed houses.

2016 Preservation Awards – Historic Landscape

The Historic Landscape Award recognizes and encourages the preservation, restoration and stewardship of historically significant landscapes in our nine-county region.

2016 Historic Landscape Award recipient - Hurd Orchards. Photo by Andy Olenick.

2016 Historic Landscape Award recipient – Hurd Orchards. Photo by Andy Olenick.

Hurd Orchards
17260 Ridge Road, Town of Murray, Orleans County

Established nearly 200 years ago, this historic farm is owned and operated by the seventh generation of the Hurd family. Located in northeast Orleans County, the large fruit and flower farm is a major agricultural operation in the region. While maintaining the historic agricultural character of the orchards, fields, and outbuildings, the family has also continued to operate their property as a working farm. Historic preservation of the property’s buildings has also been a priority for the Hurd family, who has rehabilitated a number of the 19th-century houses on the farm. In addition to agriculture, the family established “Hurd Orchards,” a farm market on Ridge Road that offers retail, wholesale, special events, and a catalogue business based on the seasonal fruit, flower and bakery products that originate on the farm.

The Landmark Society’s 2016 Annual Preservation Awards ceremony will take place on Sunday, November 13 at 3 PM in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the handsomely restored Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street.

2016 Preservation Awards – Stewardship

The Stewardship Award recognizes an individual or organization who has provided continued care of and commitment to the preservation of an architecturally and/or historically significant public property over a period of years.

2016 Stewardship Award recipient - St. James Episcopal Church, Batavia. Photo by Bill Farmer.

2016 Stewardship Award recipient – St. James Episcopal Church, Batavia. Photo by Bill Farmer.

St. James Episcopal Church
405 East Main Street, City of Batavia, Genesee County

One of the oldest congregations in Genesee County, St. James Episcopal Church is a major landmark on Main Street in the city of Batavia.  Its landmark Gothic Revival building was constructed in 1908 and features cut stone construction with cast stone detailing.  Over the past several years, the congregation has completed a major restoration of the exterior cast stone, tower, and quarried stone on their historic edifice.  This $400,000 project included a grant from the Sacred Sites program, as well as several innovative fund-raising efforts.  This challenging project included fabricating new cast concrete details, covering coping joints with lead and copper flashing, careful patching of stonework, building a new roof deck and deck structure with steel beams, and restoring stained glass windows.  The project was coordinated by Bero Architecture, PLLC with Catenary Construction (masonry), Pike Stained Glass Studio, and Southside Pre-Cast of Buffalo, contractors.

The Landmark Society’s 2016 Annual Preservation Awards ceremony will take place on Sunday, November 13 at 3 PM in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the handsomely restored Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street.

2016 Preservation Awards – Award of Merit

Next up for our 2016 Preservation Awards are the winners of the Award of Merit, which is presented for the sympathetic rehabilitation of a historic building or structure in our nine-county region completed within the past two years.

2016 Award of Merit recipient - Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse

2016 Award of Merit recipient – Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse. Photo by Sheridan Vincent.

Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse
70 Lighthouse Street, City of Rochester, Monroe County

This challenging project features the restoration of America’s oldest lighthouse on Lake Ontario, which is owned by Monroe County and managed by the Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse Historical Society.  Using historic documentation from the National Park Service and National Archives, the 1863 keeper’s residence and 1822 stone tower are being restored to their original 19th century appearance. The restoration of the brick house includes the re-creation of the original entrance surround, sidelights, door and windows, as well as new louvered shutters and window detailing.  Major masonry and structural repair to the stone tower and its upper lantern room, as well as the installation of a newly fabricated Fresnel lens in the tower were recently completed. Eight new coats of whitewash on the stone tower have replicated the original protective finish that has been missing for over a century. Bero Architecture PLLC, is the project designer, in coordination with the National Park Service.

2016 Award of Merit recipient - Skalny Building: Bivona Child Advocacy Center. Photo by Tim Wilkes

2016 Award of Merit recipient – Skalny Building: Bivona Child Advocacy Center. Photo by Tim Wilkes.

Skalny Building:  Bivona Child Advocacy Center
1 Mt. Hope Avenue, City of Rochester, Monroe County

Rochester’s oldest surviving industrial building and a City of Rochester designated landmark, the former “Old Stone Warehouse” has been sensitively rehabilitated to house the Bivona Child Advocacy Center. This $5.3 million project now houses the headquarters of an innovative organization and its partner agencies, with teams of specialists, treating child sexual and physical abuse, all at one location. Completed with a major donation from the Skalny Foundation, the rehabilitation of this c. 1820 stone building brings new use to an important South Wedge neighborhood landmark. The building is listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Place and was rehabilitated using the Federal Tax Credit program. Architect Norbert Hausner was the lead architect and Saralinda Hooker was the historic preservation consultant for this distinctive preservation project.

2016 Award of Merit - Button Loft Apartments.

2016 Award of Merit – Button Loft Apartments.

Button Loft Apartments
340 Rutgers Street, City of Rochester, Monroe County

Originally built in 1903-04 as the M.B. Shantz Button Co. factory, this former industrial building has been creatively renovated as 39 loft apartments.  In recent decades, this prominent building, located just off Monroe Avenue, was used as a warehouse for office equipment.  Now listed in the State and National Register of Historic Places,  the handsome brick building has been completely transformed, with original window openings uncovered,  glass windows installed, interiors redesigned as loft apartments, and the site enhanced for this important transformation from commercial to residential use. Owned by DHD Ventures and designed by Passero Associates, architects, this revitalized building was rehabilitated using the Federal Tax Credit program.

2016 Award of Merit recipient - Church of the Most Holy Trinity.

2016 Award of Merit recipient – Church of the Most Holy Trinity.

Church of the Most Holy Trinity
1460 Ridge Road, Town of Webster, Monroe County

Designed by Rochester architect Joseph Oberlies, the dramatic Church of the Most Holy Trinity was constructed in 1901 at the eastern edge of the village of Webster. The handsome Romanesque Revival church has been undergoing a major rehabilitation over the past several years. This challenging project included exterior repairs, including  a new Spanish slate roof, new expanded copper gutters, final and cornice work, restoration of the South stained glass “Rose window,” bell tower repair and re-pointing and new copper reproductions of exterior detailing, such as pinnacles and the large cross on the roof.  Bero Architecture, PLLC was project architect, working with contractors Kurt Catalano, CSTM Corporation; George Easton, Easton Specialties; and Valerie O’Hara, Pike Stained Glass.

The Landmark Society’s 2016 Annual Preservation Awards ceremony will take place on Sunday, November 13 at 3 PM in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the handsomely restored Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street.

 

2016 Preservation Awards – Barber Conable Award

It’s time again for the Landmark Society’s 2016 Annual Awards Ceremony. Join us on Sunday, November 13 at 3:00 p.m. at Rochester’s historic City Hall, a dramatic 1880s landmark built as the Federal Court House and Post Office that was rehabilitated and re-opened in 1978 as the new City Hall.

A highlight of the calendar year, the Awards are given to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area that have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, public buildings, historic properties, and landscapes.

Over the next two weeks, we’ll be previewing the winners for each category. First up is the Barber Conable Award, which recognizes a large-scale rehabilitation of a historic building in our region completed within the past two years. This includes buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places and projects utilizing the Federal Investment Tax Credit Program.

2016 Barber Conable Award Recipient - Michelsen Apartments

2016 Barber Conable Award Recipient – Michelsen Apartments

This year’s Conable Award recognizes the “M+M” projectMichelsen Apartments, located at 182 Avenue D, and Mills III Apartments, located at 281 Mills Street, City of Rochester, Monroe County. M+M was completed by the Urban League Economic Development Corporation, with Edgemere Development Corporation as project contractor.

The former George G. Michelsen Furniture Factory, built in 1914, housed one of Rochester’s longest-running family businesses, dating from the 1860s to the late 1950s. Located adjacent to the El Camino Trail and Avenue D Community Center in northeast Rochester, the Michelsen business moved from a downtown location on Water Street to this location, with its proximity to the railroad, as part of the decentralization movement of that time.

2016 Barber Conable Award Recipient, Mills III Apartments

2016 Barber Conable Award Recipient, Mills III Apartments

A prominent landmark in the High Falls area, at the corner of Mill and Factory streets,  Mills III is the third and final phase of “The Mills at High Falls” project.  It dates from 1850-70 during that area’s build-up of flour mills. Tenants in this complex included woodworking, a foundry, tin shop and cornice works and, around 1920, the Rochester Marshmallow Company. Shortly afterwards, Rochester Plumbing Supply moved to this location, where it remained until several years ago.

Listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, these two properties were rehabilitated using the Federal Investment Tax Credit program.  The $18.5 million rehabilitation of these former industrial properties created a total of 59 affordable, one- and two-bedroom apartments.  The Michelsen Apartments were designed by Glasgow Simmons Architecture LLP, with Jason Simmons as lead architect. Mills III was designed by Barkstrom and LaCroix, with Rich Lindner, lead architect.

2016 Five to Revive announced

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Today we announced our 2016 Five to Revive – a list that identifies opportunities for targeted, strategic revitalization. The announcement was made at our headquarters on South Fitzhugh St. in Rochester. The list includes:

  • Former Rochester Brewing Company complex, Rochester, NY
  • Downtown Perry Block of Commercial Buildings, Village of Perry, Wyoming County
  • Dove Block, City of Geneva, Ontario County
  • Lake Ontario State Parkway, Monroe and Orleans Counties
  • The Traditional Trades

>>Click here to see the 2016 Five to Revive.

“This the fourth year that The Landmark Society of Western New York is announcing the Five to Revive list to call attention to key properties and priorities for revitalization in western New York,” said Wayne Goodman Executive Director.

“The Five to Revive initiative is proving to be very successful and continues to showcase our ongoing efforts demonstrating that preservation and adaptive reuse are effective strategies for revitalization in Western New York,” said Tom Castelein, Vice-President of Preservation on The Landmark Society Board who chairs the Five to Revive initiative.

The 2016 Five to Revive list represents a diverse selection of buildings, landscapes and preservation issues in Western New York.

Significant Progress

“Each year, The Landmark Society works closely on these priorities with owners, municipal officials, and developers to facilitate investment and foster rehabilitation,” said Goodman. The ultimate goal is to return these important historic resources to a place of prominence in their respective communities, as economic and social assets that spark even more investment and revitalization.

Most of the 2015 Five to Revive properties have moved closer to that goal. “The Cattaraugus County Memorial and Historical Building has had a bumpy ride but with the hard work of a local advocacy group, Citizens Advocating Memorial Preservation (CAMP), things are looking brighter,” said Castelein. “The County is examining options for selling the property while our staff works with CAMP to explore options for future uses.”

The Former Wollensak Optical Company is on the market. The Main St. East/North Clinton Avenue Retail District will soon be listed in the National Register of Historic Places, providing developers access to the historic tax credit programs.

“Our partner on the Lockwood-Alhart Cobblestone House and Retail Plaza, NeighborWorks Rochester, has acquired funding to design a welcoming public space in front of the building,” said Goodman. “This should be the first step in making the Cobblestone a friendlier environment for the neighborhood.”

The Landmark Society is also working with two Fraternal Meeting Halls, the Grange Hall in Huron and the Carter Memorial G.A.R. Hall in Nunda, to assist with repairs and ideas for creative programming. The Huron Grange Hall also received funding from The Landmark Society’s Preservation Grant Fund to plan repairs, some of which were completed this summer.

>>Click here to see the 2016 Five to Revive.

Call for Session Proposals

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The 2017 NY Statewide Preservation Conference will take place April 6-8th in downtown Rochester. This conference will be presented by The Landmark Society of Western New York, Preservation Buffalo Niagara, Historic Albany Foundation, The Preservation League of New York State and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

In order to make this conference a success, we need your preservation projects, ideas and initiatives. Share your success stories, challenges, and new ideas with preservationists and community advocates from across the state. Submit your session proposal by Monday, November 14th (at 11:59 PM) in order to be considered. Proposals on a wide variety of topics are welcome and encouraged.

 >>Click here to see more detailed information and submit a conference proposal.

Preservation Grant Fund Deadline: October 28

Naples Memorial Town Hall.

Naples Memorial Town Hall.

Applications are now available for our next round of funding. Launched in September 2012, The Landmark Society’s Preservation Grant Fund program offers funds for preliminary design and planning studies to help make positive improvements to at-risk buildings. The program was initially funded through a bequest from Elizabeth (Libby) Stewart. Libby was a longtime Landmark Society staff member who was dedicated to the revitalization of neighborhoods and historic structures.

Huron Grange in Huron

Huron Grange in Huron

The Preservation Grant Fund provides initial “start-up” funding to assist in saving historic resources. The grant will not pay for any “bricks and mortar” work. Only pre-construction services are eligible for funding. Specific use of funds is flexible. Examples of eligible projects include:

  • code compliance studies
  • construction estimates
  • visual project renderings
  • measured drawings
  • cost comparisons
Gates Hall in Pultneyville.

Gates Hall in Pultneyville.

Recent grant recipients have included: First Presbyterian Church in Holley; Gates Hall in Pultneyville; Huron Grange in Huron; and Naples Memorial Town Hall.

The amount of each request may not exceed $3,500. It is anticipated that the average gift will be approximately $2,500.

First Presbyterian Church in Holley.

First Presbyterian Church in Holley.

Contact Caitlin Meives to discuss your project and obtain an application. Applications will be due Friday, October 28, 2016.

For more information, visit the Preservation Grant Fund page.

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