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Preservation Awards Program

Preservation Awards Program

Each fall, The Landmark Society presents awards to projects, people, and organizations who, through their dedication and hard work, have contributed to historic preservation in our nine-county area.

The Landmark Society’s Awards Committee is now seeking recommendations for its 2018 Preservation Awards. Award suggestions are welcome from Genesee, Monroe, Livingston, Ontario, Orleans, Seneca, Wayne, Wyoming and Yates counties.

Below is a list of the award categories, along with descriptions and criteria for each award. If you know any project or person deserving of any of these awards, please email your suggestions to Cynthia Howk at chowk@landmarksociety.org by Tuesday, May 1, 2018. The Awards Committee will begin reviewing submissions at its May meeting.

If you have any questions, please contact Cynthia by email or phone at (585) 546-7029 x24.

Award of Merit
Award of Merit

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building or structure in our nine-county region completed within the past two years.

Installed in 1950 on the east bank of Oatka Creek, this distinctive replica of the Statue of Liberty was part of a national project to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America. Two hundred of these statues were offered to communities throughout the U.S.  Today, only a few dozen survive. Constructed of copper and standing over eight-feet-tall, this replica in LeRoy suffered from decades of damage and deterioration. The LeRoy Historical Society coordinated restoration of the statue and construction of a new plinth with an impressive corps of advisors including architect Lindsay Yoder, Thomas Podner of McKay Lodge Fine Arts Conservation Lab in Ohio, Southside Concrete in Buffalo,  New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation, Orcon Industries, Bubba’s Landscaping, and contractors Rob McQuillen and Bobby Latham.

Award of Merit
Award of Merit

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building or structure in our nine-county region completed within the past two years.

A signature project of architect Claude Bragdon and a designated City of Rochester landmark, this handsome, 1910 classroom building for Mechanics Institute has been rehabilitated as 15 loft-style apartments, with offices on the first floor. Originally featuring classrooms, art studios, and gallery space, the building was used by Rochester Institute of Technology as late as the 1960s. It subsequently became offices in the 1990s, but remained vacant for the next 15 years. The $2.7 million rehabilitation utilized historic tax credits and was completed by Syracuse developer, Douglas Sutherland of Franklin Properties LLC with Rochester partner Patrick Dutton.  King + King Architects in Syracuse were project designers.

Award of Merit
Award of Merit

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building or structure in our nine-county region completed within the past two years.

Built of Medina sandstone in 1939-40 by members of the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps, the bathhouse has undergone a complete renovation to protect its historic integrity and modernize its public spaces.  The $1.5 million project included repairing the historic masonry and replacing the roof to re-establish the building’s historic appearance.  In addition to mechanical and interior upgrades, the exterior areas of the facility were renovated with new stamped concrete walkways, an ADA-compliant ramp, new landscaping and outdoor shower towers. This project was coordinated by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, with F.W.Construction Co. of Rochester, general contractor.

Award of Merit
Award of Merit

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building or structure in our nine-county region completed within the past two years.

American Hall Building and former Citizens Bank
59 Market Street & 8 Main Street, Village of Attica, Wyoming County

A major project by local developer Bruce Camp, the innovative rehabilitation of the American Hall Building (1872) and former Citizens Bank (1867; 1912) in Attica’s downtown business district is an exemplary effort in this Wyoming County community. Located in the Attica Market & Main Historic District, these two buildings were rehabilitated with a grant from the New York Main Street program, as well as historic tax credits. Newly renovated commercial spaces at the American Hall Building include retailer Attica Auto Supply, a community room, and offices.  Vacant for a number of years, the former bank now features commercial space on the first floor and the potential for apartments on the upper floors.  Rick Hauser of In.Site: Architecture was the consulting architect.

Craftsman, Special Citation and Special Achievement Awards
Ted Robertson, carpenter-contractor, Kirkwall Construction, Rochester, NY; recipient of 2017 Craftsman Award
Craftsman, Special Citation and Special Achievement Awards

These awards provide for projects that do not fit into the above categories or recognize outstanding individual or group accomplishments in the field of historic preservation. This award need not be given every year.

With an impressive range of woodworking projects, Ted Robertson is a veteran craftsman whose artistry has enhanced historic buildings in the greater Rochester area for over thirty years. A graduate of Carnegie-Mellon University, Ted originally trained as an engineer.  After a brief foray into the corporate world, his early interest in carpentry, skills honed by evening vocational classes, and a keen curiosity in old buildings drew him to his current work as a carpenter-contractor.  He is known for his attention to detail, insistence on a rigid schedule, business sense, safety concerns, and over-all professionalism.  As a carpenter who specializes in older buildings, he works with near-forgotten techniques, rare or obsolete materials, and decades-long deterioration that needs repair.  Ted has trained many helpers over the years and has a loyal, accomplished crew.  Special projects include the restoration of the massive corbel bracket on the 1835 Campbell-Whittlesey House and the reconfiguration of pews at the First Universalist Church.  Complicated window projects, perfect porches, stair stabilizations, and shutter repairs – one of which was featured as a cover story in the “Old House Journal” magazine – attest to the exceptional range of skills that Ted has developed over the past thirty years.

Paul Malo Award for Community Preservation Advocacy

This award was established this year in honor of the late Syracuse University architect, professor, and preservation advocate who was a friend and colleague of the Landmark Society for over four decades. The award recognizes community activists who have done outstanding work in the field of historic preservation. This award need not be given every year.

Lynne J. Belluscio
Lynne J. Belluscio is an individual whose dedication, work and commitment to the Le Roy community has resulted in a wider awareness of and appreciation for its history and built environment.  Long active in historic preservation advocacy, Lynne has served as Director of the LeRoy Historical Society for over 20 years.  During that time, she has authored several books and over 1,000 articles on LeRoy history for the local “Pennysaver” newspaper.  During her tenure, the “Jell-O Gallery” was created on the Society’s campus.  This venue draws over 10,000 visitors each year and highlights “America’s Most Famous Dessert,” which was invented in LeRoy.  Lynne’s work with residents and elected officials has resulted in a new awareness of the historic resources in the community. An authority on 19th-century open hearth cooking, Lynne previously served as lead interpreter and director of special events at the Genesee Country Museum for 15 years.  Lynne has worked with a wide range of organizations, including the Western New York Association of Historical Agencies and the Association for Living History, Farm, and Agricultural Museums, an international organization for which she has served as a trustee.

Trude Brown Fitelson
A Rochester native and a life-long summer resident of the Thousand Island Park community, Trude Brown Fitelson’s year-round preservation efforts have been described by some as a second career.  The National Register listing of Thousand Island Park and its protection are a testament to her remarkable patience, stamina, and perseverance.  Located on Wellesley Island in the St. Lawrence River, this community began as a Methodist campground in 1875 and became a popular resort area by the turn of the century.  By the 1960s, however, the historic Victorian buildings in TIP were far past their heyday.  Beginning in the 1970s, Trude spearheaded on-going preservation awareness and rehabilitation projects in the park. A former trustee of The Landmark Society, Trude’s diligent work and preservation advocacy at TIP continues today, and have expanded to include projects with the Thousand Island Land Trust, the Antiques Boat Museum, and the Clayton Opera House.

Historic Landscape Award
The Wadsworth Family: The Homestead and Hartford House properties, Main Street, Village of Geneseo, Livingston County; recipient of 2017 Historic Landscape Award
Historic Landscape Award

This award recognizes and encourages the preservation, restoration, rehabilitation and stewardship of historically significant landscapes. The recipient may be either an individual(s) or an organization. This award need not be given every year.

Located in one of the few villages to achieve National Historic Landmark designation, the two estate properties of the Wadsworth family date back to the 1790s. With an initial purchase of 2,000 acres, the family holdings increased over the years, eventually becoming one of the largest properties in western New York.  Two unique homes were built, located at the north and south ends of Geneseo’s Main Street.  Set on a 300-acre site, The Homestead was originally built c. 1804, but moved and expanded on its South Main Street location in the late 19th century.  Today, it is the oldest, continually owned private estate west of the Hudson River.  William Wadsworth and his family are the sixth generation to care for this house, which has transitioned into an event center. Hartford House, built c. 1840s, is the Wadsworth residence located at the north end of the village. Designed after Hartford House in London, England, this elegant, Regency Revival residence is the home of Wadsworth family member, Corrin Strong, and is also available for special events.  Both properties retain much of their agricultural character, including historic outbuildings, the original land office, extensive acreage, magnificent views across the valley, and the signature “Wadsworth oaks,” that have characterized this unique landscape for nearly 200 years.

Historic Home Award
1316 East Avenue, Rochester, NY – Owners: Lewis & Kathy Parker; recipient of 2017 Historic House Award
Historic Home Award

This award recognizes owners of private residences for their continued care of and commitment to the preservation of an architecturally significant house over a minimum of seven years. “Care” may include appropriate rehabilitation and/or sympathetic new additions according to need. Thoughtful rehabilitation/restoration of the interior and/or significant features of a historical landscape may enhance the quality of the nomination. The seven year criteria may be waived in special circumstances as deemed appropriate by the awards committee.

Located in Rochester’s East Avenue Preservation District, this handsome Tudor Revival style residence was designed in 1912 by architect Leon Stern for Samuel Weil, president of Michaels-Stern Clothing Company.  From the 1920s to ‘70s, it was the home of Bausch & Lomb Co. executive, M. Herbert Eisenhart and his wife, Elsa. Over the past seven years, the Parkers have completed an extensive rehabilitation of the house, including numerous exterior repairs, restoration of interior details and materials, and the complete reconstruction of the 1920s Aeolian Co. pipe organ, which had been dismantled and stored in the house.

Stewardship Award

This award recognizes an individual or organization that has proved continued care of and commitment to the preservation of an architecturally and/or historically significant public property over a period of years. “Care” can include appropriate changes to the building fabric. Eligible properties include religious, educational, not-for-profit, commercial or government buildings, structures, objects or sites. (For private residences, see “Historic Home Award”).

Award of Merit
Palmyra Community Library, 402 E. Main Street, Village of Palmyra, Wayne County; one of four 2017 Award of Merit recipients
Award of Merit

This award applies to projects similar to those eligible for the above mentioned Conable Award, but of more modest scope. The award is given for a sympathetic rehabilitation of an architecturally significant building, structure, object or site. Candidacy may be enhanced if the project is historically significant or if it strengthens its neighborhood. The project must have been completed within the past two years. The above award cannot be given to single-family residences.

Originally built in 1907 for the offices of the Garlock Packing Company, this handsome, brick building has been dramatically transformed into the new headquarters of the Palmyra Community Library. Vacant for a number of years, the highly visible building was purchased in 2007 by a newly formed public/private partnership, who sought a larger location for the library, which had outgrown its previous location. The challenging, two-phase project was coordinated by Bero Architecture, PLLC.  Careful planning retained original windows, wood floors, interior staircases, and woodwork, while removing later-built partitions, adding an elevator, encapsulating asbestos, and creating a new meeting space and gallery on the third floor.

Barber Conable Award
Eastman Gardens, 800 E. Main Street, City of Rochester, Monroe County; recipient of 2017 Barber Conable Award
Barber Conable Award

A major rehabilitation project completed within the last two years, possibly using Federal Investment Tax Credit program. Old fabric should be sympathetically maintained and carefully rehabilitated. New construction, if any, should be compatible and of high authentic quality. This award need not be given if no project meets the standards.

This year’s Conable Award recognizes a remarkable and challenging project, completed by Home Leasing Services, LLC with Edgemere Development Corporation, to rehabilitate the former Eastman Dental Dispensary into Eastman Gardens Senior Housing Community. Included in The Landmark Society’s 2013 Five to Revive after sitting vacant for 40 years, the $20.7 million project utilized historic tax credits, low income housing tax credits, and state funding to create 52 apartments, including 43 affordable and nine market-rate units for seniors and physically-handicapped persons. Built in 1917, the Eastman Dental Dispensary was the first of six dental dispensaries funded by Kodak’s George Eastman. With design work executed by architect Jason Simmons of Glasow Simmons Architecture L.L.P., the project also included artists Lex Blaakman and Karen Tremer, who painstakingly recreated missing woodwork, decorative ornamentation and the beloved mural with fairy and folktale characters in the former children’s waiting room.