Maplewood Neighborhood Workshop: Funding Your Old House Rehab

Calling all Maplewood Neighborhood residents looking for funding  for rehab projects of your historic home!

07ja-flower_city

Please join staff from The New York State Historic Preservation Office (NY SHPO)Neighborwoks Rochester and The Landmark Society on Tuesday Feb. 18 at 6:00 PM to learn about the NY State Historic Homeowners Rehab Tax Credit program and how you could qualify!

>>Click here to view the event flyer

Photos Courtesy Dan Dangler

The Historic Tax Credit Program & Appropriate Design Workshop

AIA Rochester and The Landmark Society present a new workshop designed with architects, developers and property owners in mind: The Historic Tax Credit Program & Appropriate Design. Grab your lunch and head over to Erdman Anthony’s offices at the Culver Road Armory for an insider’s view of the historic tax credit programs. Experts from the Buffalo-based historic preservation firm, Preservation Studios,  will present an overview of the state and federal historic tax credit program with a specific focus on designing within the Department of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. Visit AIA Rochester’s website to register. Hurry–space is limited! AIA/CES credits available.

>>Click here for the workshop flyer

Tuesday, February 18th | 12:00 p.m. | $5 | Visit AIA Rochester’s website to register.

The Historic Tax Credit Program & Appropriate Design Workshop

landmark_taxprogram_graphic_small

Join AIA Rochester and The Landmark Society on February 18 for a new workshop designed with architects, developers and property owners in mind: The Historic Tax Credit Program & Appropriate Design, featuring experts from the Buffalo-based historic preservation firm, Preservation Studios.

>>Click here for more information

Best of 2013: Preservation in WNY

It’s that time of year, when pundits, news outlets, and TV shows look back on the year in review, when  Facebook and Twitter feeds are filled with best-of lists. So why not jump on the bandwagon? Here’s our look back at 2013 with a highlight of 13 preservation successes.

1. Walk the Walk reaches over 1600 students

With a new specialized Rochester African-American History Rap program for 2nd graders, Walk the Walk this year reached a record-setting number of children–over 1600 students plus over 200 teachers and chaperones.

IMG_0876

2. Preservation Conference

Our Preservation Conference in the village of Brockport was a roaring success with new speakers, timely topics and nearly 200 community advocates, municipal leaders, and preservation professionals in attendance.IMG_20130420_095329_505

3. Launched Five to Revive program

In May, we announced our inaugural Five to Revive list, with Mayor Thomas Richards, County Executive Maggie Brooks, and Senator Joe Robach (among others) in attendance. Since then, we have been working with stakeholders to find solutions to move these properties forward towards revitalization. Two of the properties have rehabilitation plans in the works.

Pulaski Library Press Event 5272_3
Five to Revive press conference held in May, 2013 at the Pulaski Library. [Photo courtesy Richard Margolis]

4. Free Academy

2013 saw the completion of the rehabilitation of the Free Academy at 13 S. Fitzhugh St. in Rochester. One of downtown’s most recognizable buildings, the Free Academy had long been vacant. The award-winnng rehab project was completed by developers George and Katia Traikos.

Free Academy Building 7271_3

5. Inside Downtown Tour

Our Inside Downtown Tour in the Cascade District sold out. Nearly 2000 ticket holders toured rehabbed historic buildings in a downtown Rochester that is experiencing an exciting revitalization. The Tour showcased pivotal and award-winning adaptive reuses, including Bridge Square, the mid-century modern 44 Exchange, the Free Academy, and modern infill townhouses on Plymouth Ave.

IDT_2013_flag

6. Stone-Tolan Historic Site

Due to the generosity of the Davenport-Hatch Foundation and the Rochester Area Community Foundation, this summer we were able to bring in some of the finest craftsmen in the region to bring this spectacular property back to its former glory.  Master carpenters Matt Sweger and Eric Cady rebuilt custom wooden storm windows, repaired trim, rebuilt animal pens and the wooden well as well as completed repairs on the historic barn. Tim McGrath and his meticulous crew of painters painted not only the house and barn but also the majestic wooden fence that encloses the heirloom apple orchard and runs the length of the property.

StoneTolan_Rehab_2small

Stone Tolan House 7113_2

Stone-Tolan Historic Site. Photo courtesy Richard Margolis.

7. Clarendon Stone Store

After a year and a half of cooperative marketing efforts and preservation advocacy with the Town of Clarendon, the Clarendon Stone Store was sold (for $1!) to new owners who have already begun rehabbing this iconic 1836 landmark. We can’t wait to see what 2014 brings!

Town Supervisor Richard Moy, right, presented the keys of the Clarendon Stone Stone to Sue and Joe Fertitta on Friday. The couple also was presented a souvenir T-Shirt from the town’s bicentennial. An image of the store is on the back of the shirt. Photo courtesy OrleansHub.com.

8. Over $15,000 in grant money

In the second year of the Preservation Grant Fund program, we provided $15,100 to help kickstart rehab projects for at-risk properties throughout the region. Grant recipients included: the Sampson Theatre in Penn Yan, Genesee Baptist Church in Rochester, Pratt Opera Theater in Albion, Church of God and Saints in Christ (former Leopold St. Shul) in Rochester, Pulaski Library in Rochester, Valentown Hall in Victor, Kingston Hotel in Canaseraga, and College Hall at the Elim Bible Institute in Lima.

Pratt_Albion_option2
Pratt Opera Theater in Albion.

9. 660 W Main

Working with neighborhood residents, we advocated for the preservation and reuse of this vacant historic church in Rochester. Claiming that the building was a hazard and unfit for rehabilitation, in 2012, the owner proposed replacing the historic building with a new Dollar General store. A structural engineer’s report, funded by a Landmark Society grant, determined that the building was structurally sound. Although the ultimate fate of 660 W Main still remains uncertain, the City’s Zoning Board of Appeals denied the owner’s application for a variance to demolish the building.

660WMain

10. Ghost Walk’s 20th Anniversary

The award-winning Landmark Society Ghost Walk reached its 20th anniversary of sharing Rochester’s architecture and historic in a dramatic, spooky format.

GhostWalk_2013_small

11. 19th Ward project begins

Working closely with the 19th Ward Community Association, we began a project to create four National Register Historic Districts in the 19th Ward neighborhood. National Register listing will allow homeowners to qualify for the NYS historic homeowner rehab tax credits, helping strengthen ongoing revitalization efforts in the neighborhood. To help complete this project, The Landmark Society and the 19th Ward Community Association were awarded generous grant funding from the Rochester Area Community Foundation, the Preservation League of New York State, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

H_19thWard_SibleyTract_PrimaryProjectImage

12. Diamond Jubilee Celebration

Along with about 300 of our closest friends (members, donors and supporters), in November we celebrated 75 years of past accomplishments and the success of our new initiatives.

Over 300 members and supporters attended the Diamond Jubilee Celebration

Over 300 members and supporters attended the Diamond Jubilee Celebration

13. 75th Anniversary Campaign

At our Diamond Jubilee Celebration, we announced the successful completion of our 75th Anniversary fundraising campaign. Thanks to our many generous supporters we surpassed our goal, raising $555,000 to fund new initiatives and re-invigorate existing programs.

Landmark-75-logo-withtext-color smallNOTAGLINE

 

 

Award of Merit: 44 Exchange Boulevard

The Landmark Society’s 2013 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 10 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building in our 9-county region completed within the past two years.

44 Exchange Boulevard
44 Exchange Boulevard, City of Rochester

44Exchange_small

Located near the Four Corners and across the street from the Blue Cross Arena, the International-style, former Central Trust Bank Building was built in 1959 and designed by Rochester architect Carl Traver.  Listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, it has been creatively rehabilitated as contemporary apartments and first-floor retail space.

051 10101.JP.501.FurnishedApt.25612 002.reduced

Project challenges for this building included restoring the original glass wall tiles and fabricating new aluminum sash that reflected the original design, yet included modern, energy-saving features.

Photo Courtesy Bero Architecture PLLC

One of the youngest buildings to use the Federal Investment Tax Credit program, this mid-century modern building was rehabilitated by Rochester developers Ben Kendig and James Phillippone, who teamed with R.J. Lindsay Buildings and Interiors and  Bero Architecture PLLC.  The project was also a recipient of a 2013 Preservation Award from the Preservation League of New York State.

>>Click here to learn more about this project!

Visit our Success Stories page to see other 2013 Award winners, and check out last year’s winners!

Award of Merit: Bridge Square Building

The Landmark Society’s 2013 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 10 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building in our 9-county region completed within the past two years.

Bridge Square Building
242 West Main Street, City of Rochester

Photo courtesy of Richard Margolis

Photo courtesy of Richard Margolis

Located in the Bridge Square Historic District, this handsome industrial building is situated at the western gateway into the city’s downtown business district.  It was originally built around 1900 as the headquarters of the J. Hungerford Smith Company, manufacturers of flavored syrups and soda fountain products.  Its subsequent uses were a City Hall annex, a trade/high school, and, most recently, the Josh Lofton High School of the City School District. The building was purchased by Passero Associates, who rehabilitated it for mixed use, sustainable, design that includes their own offices, retail spaces, and loft-style apartments.

Photo Courtesy Gene Avallone

Photo Courtesy Gene Avallone

Major rehabilitation work included the replacement of much-altered exterior windows with new window sash fabricated in the style of the original, c.1900 windows.   Listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, the project was completed by Passero Associates, in conjunction with Spoleta Construction, using the Federal Investment Tax Credit program for income-producing properties.

Photo Courtesy Don Corcoran Photography

Photo Courtesy Don Corcoran Photography

Visit our Success Stories page to see 2012 Preservation Award winners and stay tuned for more 2013 winners!

Barber Conable Award: Holy Rosary Apartments

The Landmark Society’s 2013 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 10 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Barber Conable Award recognizes a large-scale rehabilitation of an historic building in our region completed within the past two years. This includes buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places and projects utilizing the Federal Investment Tax Credit Program.

This year’s recipient of our major preservation award is Holy Rosary Apartments.  Established in Rochester’s Edgerton neighborhood in the early 20th century, the former Holy Rosary campus features handsome buildings designed in the Mediterranean Revival style.

Holy Rosary Apartments Credit Preservation Studios

Photo courtesy of Preservation Studios

The church (c.1916) has been adapted as a community center and 35 affordable housing apartments have been created in the former rectory, convent and school buildings.  Listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, the campus buildings were rehabilitated using the Federal Investment Tax Credit program and design review by the NYS Office of Historic Preservation.

holy

Photo courtesy Richard Margolis

This $15,000,000 project was coordinated by Providence Housing Development Corporation, working with SWBR Architects & Engineers, PC and LeCesse Construction Corporation.

Visit our Success Stories page to see 2012 Preservation Award winners and stay tuned for more 2013 winners!

Mid-Century Modern Reborn at 44 Exchange

by Katie Eggers Comeau, Architectural Historian, Bero Architecture, PLLC

In August 2012, the first residential tenants began moving into the former Central Trust Building in downtown Rochester, the youngest building in our region ever rehabilitated using federal and state tax credits for historic rehabilitation.

44Exchange_sidebyside

The project began in 2010, when developers James Philippone and Ben Kendig, both of whom have long experience completing challenging local rehabilitation projects, teamed up with R.S. Lindsay Buildings & Interiors to tackle the renewal of the International-Style former bank and office building, built in 1959. They identified the possibility of using rehabilitation tax credits as part of their financing package. One problem: only National Register-listed buildings can take advantage of the credit, and this building had never been listed or officially determined eligible for listing.

Step one, therefore, was to establish that the building met National Register criteria – not always an easy case to make for a mid-twentieth century building. Fortunately, we were not starting entirely from scratch: a study of mid-twentieth century architecture in downtown Rochester commissioned by The Landmark Society in 2009 had already identified the building as a “genuine example of the International Style.”

The building, designed by Carl Traver for the Pike Company, was well documented at the time of its construction, when it was hailed as “another major contribution to the physical improvement of the downtown area” and won a local design contest based on its “attractiveness, simplicity of design and directness of expression.” In 1964, the fourth and fifth stories were added, completing the design as originally envisioned. An elevated addition for the Trust Department was added to the east in 1968, designed by Myron Starks, who had worked with Traver on the original design.

10102.Robertson V-Wall ad

The building’s Bauhaus-inspired International Style features are best appreciated from the northwest, where the intersecting volumes housing varied functional components are most easily seen. Key to the building’s composition is the four-story curtain wall, consisting of a metal frame, porcelain-enamel panels, and glass windows, wrapping the west and south sides of the building. This curtain wall was constructed using the “Robertson Versatile Wall” (or “V-Wall”), a patented system touted as combining “the advantages of standard units with the artistic latitude of tailor-made walls” (and this building was featured in a national advertisement for the “V-Wall” system, see image above). Senior architect John Bero concluded that the Central Trust building represents “a main branch on the evolution tree of the modern curtain wall.” The importance of the curtain wall, the building’s significance as an early and strong example of corporate International Style modernism in Rochester, and the intactness of the design on the exterior all helped make the case that the building did meet National Register criteria; the building was officially listed in 2011.

While the curtain wall was key to the building’s National Register eligibility, it also presented the greatest challenges to rehabilitating the building in a historically appropriate manner. When it was built in 1959, energy costs were low and building owners relied entirely on mechanical heating and cooling systems. With its large expanses of single-paned glass and minimally operable center-pivot windows, the west- and east-facing curtain wall needed significant upgrades to meet today’s energy standards. This was not easy, as replacement hardware and weatherstripping were not available and the existing sash could not accommodate retrofit to insulated glass. After evaluating possible solutions, the design team proposed to replace the sash with custom-fabricated sash, retaining the original metal framing system. This approach, which received State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) approval during design, substantially improved energy performance while fully preserving the original appearance of the curtain wall.

020 10100.44 Exchange.KEC.22112 109 (2).reduced

Another important goal was to restore the signature glass entry at the northwest corner, which had been altered with the addition of an enclosed room to accommodate an ATM booth. This striking original feature was carefully restored, bringing back the original drama of the glass enclosure and cantilevered overhang.

021 10102.44 Exchange.Part 3 photos.KEC.24812 (57) copy.reduced

Above photos: Signature glass entry at 44 Exchange. Photos courtesy Bero Architecture, PLLC.

Every rehabilitation project has its share of surprises. Fortunately, the most memorable surprise in this project was a positive one: as 1980s finishes around the elevator walls were removed, Bero Architecture discovered that original multicolored glass wall tiles seen in historic photographs were still present beneath the drywall and paneling that had concealed them at least since the 1980s. The tiles were painstakingly restored in all elevator lobbies and are significant in bringing back some of the building’s original interior character, most of which was lost in 1980s remodeling.

040 10102.44 Exchange.KEC.27012 8.reduced

Original mid-century modern glass wall tiles in the lobby at 44 Exchange. Photo courtesy Bero Architecture, PLLC.

This project is an excellent example of how preservation can balance multiple interests and promote a variety of positive objectives: continuing to build a critical mass of downtown housing, returning an unused building to viable use, rehabilitating a piece of period architecture, and improving energy performance – all with a distinctive 1950s “Mad Men”-style flair.

051 10101.JP.501.FurnishedApt.25612 002.reduced

Banking hall at 44 Exchange. 1959.

Banking hall at 44 Exchange. 1959.

Open offices at 44 Exchange.

Open offices at 44 Exchange.

Originally published in Landmarks, The Landmark Society’s quarterly print magazine.

 

 

 

Preservation Commission Workshop (Fall 2012)

As part of our free Spring and Fall Workshop series for members of area Preservation Boards and Commissions, we met up last week at the Morgan-Manning House (headquarters for the Western Monroe Historical Society) in the village of Brockport. With Thanksgiving just two days away, an intimate (and dedicated!) group gathered from communities such as Palmyra, Naples, Fairport, Greece, Brockport, Batavia, even Buffalo!

The topic for the evening:

Making the Case in Your Community:
The Economics of Preservation & Main St
Revitalization

(with a short case study from Associate Director of Preservation, Larry Francer, on the Courthouse Girls of Farmland)

The takeaway message: Preservation makes sense. Rehabilitation of our older buildings and structures fosters economic development, community revitalization, and creates more jobs per dollar invested than new construction or other industries.

For those who couldn’t make it, you can view the full presentation by clicking below:

Thank you to the Village of Brockport and the Western Monroe Historical Society for hosting us!

Award of Merit: Annex, The Mills at High Falls

The Landmark Society’s 2012 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 4 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of this week’s Awards Ceremony, over the next few days we’ll be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic building in our nine-county region completed within the past two years.

Located in the High Falls neighborhood in the City of Rochester and originally known as the Teoronto Block, this is the oldest surviving row of commercial buildings in the city. Built between 1844-1854, this unique row of  Federal-style architecture is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The buildings have historic significance because of their association with the Brown’s Race/High Falls neighborhood during its period of rapid growth as a milling center. In addition, the buildings have architectural significance for their well-preserved features typical of downtown commercial buildings of the period, including their three-story brick facades, original window openings, stone trim elements, common gabled roofs, and surviving original interior features.

Mostly vacant for the past several decades, five of the seven buildings in this row were purchased and rehabilitated into affordable housing by the Urban League of Rochester. Working with Barkstrom & LaCroix, Architects, Stantec Consulting Services, and Jensen/BRV/Engineering, this successful partnership of professionals overcame many structural challenges to complete this $7.5 million project, which  included the use of the Federal Investment Tax Credit Program and design review by NYS Office of Historic Preservation. This outstanding project was also a recipient of a 2012 Preservation Award from the Preservation League of New York State.

Some of the interior spaces that were adapted to residential units:

The banister and door below are some of the historic architectural details that were incorporated into the rehab project:

Visit our Success Stories page to see all of the 2012 Preservation Award winners.