Progress on Main Street in Attica

Posted by Kelsey Habla, Landmark Society Summer Intern

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There are big things happening in the small Village of Attica and last week we got the chance to visit a couple of exciting renovation projects downtown. The first is an innovative reuse project that was just recently completed by property owner, Bruce Camp. The American Hall building, built in 1872, by David C. Scott, is a two-story, three-bay, brick construction on Market Street. Above the historic storefront, the second floor features windows with elaborate brick lintels, and cast stone keystones and quoins. The original woodwork on the cornice, once covered by a sign-board, was unveiled and restored, giving the building some real character. The American Hall is now home to Attica Auto, where a retail store occupies the first floor, and offices reside above. The second floor also contains a large community room complete with a large screen television, for groups to hold meetings and various activities. It is an excellent use of the space and has been quite successful thus far.

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Merchandise displayed inside the storefront of Attica Auto

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Airy and open office spaces on the second floor looking out onto Market Street

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Bruce Camp – property owner and initiator of these two outstanding projects

Bruce Camp, the owner and man responsible for the successful renovation of the American Hall building, is now taking on another challenge just down the road on Main Street. The three-story, brick building was constructed in 1867 along with its neighbors but the facade and detailed parapet were later added in 1912. It was then expanded to establish a banking institution – which remained there until 1967. The entry consists of a monumental column and pediment, with an elaborate cast-stone frieze which reads Citizen’s Bank.

The former Citizen’s Bank building has had a rocky history over the past few decades. In 1998, a developer partially renovated the first floor, with a coffee shop that never took hold. After the roof collapsed one winter, the building sat vacant for 4-5 years. However, things are looking up for this old building. A restaurateur has just opened a lovely cafe – The Prospector, on the first floor, and Bruce Camp is working hard on the upper floors to convert the space into apartments. There will be a total of three apartments, each with inventive layouts and original historic features; one has already been rented! Bruce has utilized Main Street Grants as well as State and Federal Tax Credits to complete the two projects, which he estimates cost a combined $1 million. We can’t wait to see the finished product!

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The former Citizen’s Bank building on Main Street

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Storefront windows of the newly restored Prospector cafe look out onto Main Street

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A look at one of the apartments which features an original fireplace and metal plated ceiling

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A leaded glass window in the stairway, just one of the many beautiful, original windows throughout the building

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Stairs that lead to the second floor of this two-story apartment – an interesting feature

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A view down Market Street from the roof, visible from the interior of all three apartments

summer intern KelseyKelsey Liz Habla is an Architecture major at the University at Buffalo, entering her senior year. She is from Fonda, NY and is an intern this summer at the Landmark Society and Bero Architecture.

Session Profile: Main Street Revival

The 2015 New York Statewide Preservation Conference theme is The Art of Preservation: Painting Your Community’s Future. Join us at our conference headquarters, the restored Smith Opera House in the Finger Lakes city of Geneva as we explore the role that the arts can play in helping us revitalize buildings and communities. We’ll also explore historic preservation as an art form unto itself–each building, each landscape, each community that we seek to revive requires a unique approach involving partnerships, funding sources and creative problem-solving.

Image courtesy of Katie Comeau

Image courtesy of Katie Comeau

Upstate New York boasts many small communities whose roots go deep into our state’s history. In these communities, Main Streets are the economic and cultural centers for and have been the center of civic life for generations. This sessions provides information on how two successful upstate communities spared their historic Main Streets from the wrecking ball through proactive efforts from the community, government officials, developers and consultants. Learn from the speakers how they navigated the preservation planning process from survey through rehab tax credit applications, and how both communities are on the cusp of revitalization through preservation.

Community Profile:

1.) Village of Hamburg

Hamburg is a quaint suburban village ten miles south of Buffalo, NY. Revitalization efforts  in the village date back to the 1990s, which included a village-wide reconnaissance-level historic resource survey and Main Street-focused intensive level survey that Bero Architecture conducted in 2002. In addition, revitalization work conducted by the NYS DOT was performed including four roundabouts, easing traffic congestion in the village and a streetscape and facade improvement program. These initiatives became catalysts for subsequent projects and developments along Main Street.

Image courtesy of Katie Comeau

Image courtesy of Katie Comeau

By 2012 many of the buildings had been spruced up but the Kronenberg building, the longtime anchor department store, had been vacant for several decades. A typical two-story commercial space, the village began revitalization efforts including rehabilitation, National Register nomination for the Main Street district and assistance with grant applications. Since the village laid the groundwork a developer expressed interest and now the building is back on the tax rolls, occupied and looks great!

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Images courtesy of Katie Comeau, Bero Architecture, PLLC

2.) City of Gloversville

Like many small cities in upstate New York, Gloversville’s downtown served as the hub for cultural, commercial, and civic life for generations. This beautiful, historic area survived urban renewal efforts in the 1960s and big box development in more recent years and is on the cusp of a rich revitalization. This session will look at the past, present, and future of Gloversville’s downtown.

Session Speakers:

Katie Eggers Comeau, Bero Architecture PLLC
Katie Eggers Comeau is the architectural historian at Bero Architecture PLLC, where her preservation planning projects include historic resource surveys, National Register nominations, tax credit applications, and other research and documentation projects. She speaks to many groups on topics including Rochester’s Olmsted park system, 20th century architecture, and preservation planning.

Damon Ayer, Chair, Village of Hamburg Preservation Commission and Owner Mason’s Grille 52
As chairman of the Village of Hamburg Historic Preservation Commission, Damon Ayer has spearheaded the commission’s recent efforts to revitalize Hamburg’s Main Street. He is also owner of a Main Street business, Mason’s Grille 52.

Gregory Young, Supervisor, City of Gloversville
A lifelong resident of the City of Gloversville, Gregory is in his first term on the Fulton County Board of Supervisors. Young also teaches at the College of Saint Rose in Albany. He holds volunteer and leadership positions in a variety of causes and community organizations, including membership in Smart Growth America’s Local Leaders Council. Young holds bachelors (summa cum laude) and masters degrees from the College of Saint Rose in history and political science and is currently completing a PhD from the University at Buffalo.

>>If you can’t miss this session, click here to register now!

Feeling social? Stay up to date on Conference happenings and share your thoughts using the hashtag #NYPresConf on Facebook and Twitter.

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Keynote Speaker for 2015 #NYPresConf

The 2015 New York Statewide Preservation Conference theme is The Art of Preservation: Painting Your Community’s Future. Join us at our conference headquarters, the restored Smith Opera House in the Finger Lakes city of Geneva as we explore the role that the arts can play in helping us revitalize buildings and communities. We’ll also explore historic preservation as an art form unto itself–each building, each landscape, each community that we seek to revive requires a unique approach involving partnerships, funding sources and creative problem-solving.

This year’s Keynote Speaker is Cynthia Nikitin from the Project for Public Spaces. Cynthia is no stranger to upstate New York–in 2013, in collaboration with The Landmark Society and the Community Design Center Rochester, she led a community design workshop in Lima as part of the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design (CIRD), a national program sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

We are thrilled to be welcoming Cynthia back to upstate New York!

Cynthia Nikitin SQUARECynthia Nikitin has earned a reputation as a persuasive advocate for “Placemaking” as an approach to city planning and urban design.  With a portfolio of more than 300 projects during her time at the Project for Public Spaces (PPS), Cynthia’s technical expertise stretches from the development of main street master plans and corridor enhancement projects to the creation of transit station area plans and public art master plans for major cities. This includes facilitating approximately 40 public workshops, visioning sessions, and public meetings annually. Cynthia is currently directing the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design, a leadership initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts focused on providing technical design assistance to rural communities and small towns across the United States. She also heads the “Heart of the Community” program, providing Placemaking grants to cities through PPS’s partnership with Southwest Airlines.

In her Keynote address, Placemaking: The Ultimate Art Form, Cynthia will highlight projects that integrate placemaking and historic preservation and will demonstrate how placemaking leads to the creation vibrant public spaces in and around heritage buildings, districts, and downtowns; supports the rehabilitation of historic parks to increase use; fosters the senstive, adaptive and logical reuse of historic structures to meet community needs; helps restore the historic social functions of a building, park, or a heritage district; widens the overall impact of preservation projects; and builds a broader constituency for the preservation movement.

>>Click here to return to the main Conference page to purchase your tickets!

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Feeling social? Stay up to date on Conference happenings and share your thoughts using the hashtag #NYPresConf on Facebook and Twitter.

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Call for Session Proposals: 2015 Preservation Conference

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The New York Statewide Preservation Conference is set for April 16-18, 2015 in the lakeside city of Geneva. This year’s theme, The Art of Preservation: Painting Your Community’s Future, is partially inspired by our Conference headquarters—the restored Smith Opera House. But this year’s theme goes beyond the arts—historic preservation is an art form unto itself. Each building, each landscape, each community that we seek to revive requires a unique approach involving partnerships, funding sources and creative problem-solving. And, of course, the buildings, structures and landscapes that we seek to preserve are all works of art in and of themselves.

We want to hear how you and your community have adopted the art of preservation. Session proposals on a wide variety of preservation and community revitalization related topics are welcome, including but not limited to: maintaining historic buildings; historic landscapes; economic development; Main Street revitalization; heritage tourism; community activism; planning; building reuse case studies, etc. All proposals are due by Friday, January 16th at 11:59 PM.

>>Click here to complete the submission form.

 

 

ROC the Day on 12.02.14

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We need YOU to help ROC the Day on 12.02.14!

On December 2nd, our community will come together to ROC the Day, and we at The Landmark Society of Western New York hope to make the day a huge success–for our organization and for the communities we serve. ROC the Day is a 24-hour giving opportunity to support all eligible not-for-profits in the nine-county Greater Rochester area. Community members are encouraged to visit ROCtheDay.org, a secure online giving platform, to contribute to any participating not-for-profit organization. All money given during ROC the Day stays local. If you Choose to support The Landmark Society on ROC the Day, your contribution will support the important work we do in communities large and small, rural and urban, to support preservation and community revitalization.

This year, we are directing all funds raised during this special day of giving to our Preservation Grant Fund program. Begun in 2012, this crucial program provides grants to municipalities, not-for-profits, community organizations, and potential developers to help get rehab projects off the ground. To date, the Preservation Grant has provided over $30,000 in funding to some of our region’s most important and at-risk historic buildings. (Click here and here to see some of our past grant recipients). In a very direct and immediate way, this program helps save buildings and revitalize communities. We ask you to help support this program.

After you’ve made your contribution, please help spread the word! Share the news with your friends, family and co-workers. Share the news on social media using #ROCtheDay.

And, as always, we THANK YOU for your commitment to The Landmark Society and to the communities and people of western New York.

>>Click here to ROC the Day with The Landmark Society<<
www.roctheday.org/TheLandmarkSociety

 

Historic Landscape Award: Rochester Public Market

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Historic Landscape Award recognizes and encourages the preservation, restoration and stewardship of historically significant landscapes in our 9-county region.

Rochester Public Market
280 North Union Street, city of Rochester

Image courtesy of Renaissance Hotels

Image courtesy of Renaissance Hotels

Located on this site since 1905, this City-owned market continues to play a vital role in both the Marketview Heights neighborhood and the greater Rochester community, at large. One of the most  popular and vital gathering places for retail shopping, the market campus and buildings have undergone a major rehabilitation over the past decade, an on-going project coordinated by the City of Rochester. While maintaining the historic buildings, structures and brick paving, there has been building rehabilitation, expanded retail space and extensive site improvements. This revitalization has extended out into the surrounding neighborhood, as well, creating a destination that is used and appreciated by thousands of local residents throughout the year.

Destination Main Street

Online registration has closed. Contact Carolyn Haygood at 546-7029 x11 to inquire if spots are available.

A high-impact breakfast presentation for Rochester’s business community, local officials, developers and citizens who believe in the future of their commercial corridors and the power of locally owned, small businesses.

Jon Schallert is an internationally-recognized speaker and business expert specializing in teaching businesses and communities how to turn themselves into Consumer Destinations. Schallert speaks to thousands annually on his proprietary 14-step “Destination Business” process, which he developed over the course of nearly 30 years of working with independent business owners.

Schedule

Check-in: 7:30-8:00am
Breakfast: 8:00-8:30
Presentation: 8:30-9:30
Wrap-up & networking: 9:30-10:00

Tickets

Online registration has closed. Contact Carolyn Haygood at 546-7029 x11 to inquire if spots are available.

$35/each
Purchase your tickets below or by calling 585.546.7029 x11
Is your business interested in sponsoring a table? Contact Larry Francer (585.546.7029 x14)

This event is held in partnership with Rochester Downtown Development Corp. and the Community Design Center of Rochester.

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Inside Downtown Tour 2014

View from the Top!
East Avenue and East Main Street
Proudly sponsored by Winn Development

The Inside Downtown Tour highlights urban environments where folks are creating exciting spaces to live and work. We visit re-purposed spaces, renovated homes, lovingly preserved places and newly built sites that are designed with sensitivity to the overall built environment. Basically, we get you “in” on the latest urban living trends.

This year’s tour sites radiate off of East Avenue and East Main Street.The Inside Downtown Tour will give you the “View from the Top” as penthouses and rooftops are open for the 2014 ticket holders. It’s all part of the effort to showcase urban living and working in re-purposed buildings – and to have a great time doing so!

Why are we calling it “View from the Top?” There are an extraordinary number of penthouses opening for us, plus the view from the top of One East Avenue is unequaled at any other site. You’ll have all of Rochester (and a good portion of Monroe County) at your feet.

UPDATE: Online ticket sales have closed. Purchased tickets will be available for pickup at Tour Headquarters (RoCo, 137 East Ave.) during Tour hours only. If we are not sold out, day-of tickets will also be available for purchase ($25 each) during Tour hours.

Click here for the #insidedowntown tour page

Inside Downtown Tour 2014

View from the Top!
East Avenue and East Main Street
Proudly sponsored by Winn Development

The Inside Downtown Tour highlights urban environments where folks are creating exciting spaces to live and work. We visit re-purposed spaces, renovated homes, lovingly preserved places and newly built sites that are designed with sensitivity to the overall built environment. Basically, we get you “in” on the latest urban living trends.

This year’s tour sites radiate off of East Avenue and East Main Street.The Inside Downtown Tour will give you the “View from the Top” as penthouses and rooftops are open for the 2014 ticket holders. It’s all part of the effort to showcase urban living and working in re-purposed buildings – and to have a great time doing so!

Why are we calling it “View from the Top?” There are an extraordinary number of penthouses opening for us, plus the view from the top of One East Avenue is unequaled at any other site. You’ll have all of Rochester (and a good portion of Monroe County) at your feet.

UPDATE: Online ticket sales have closed. Purchased tickets will be available for pickup at Tour Headquarters (RoCo, 137 East Ave.) during Tour hours only. If we are not sold out, day-of tickets will also be available for purchase ($25 each) during Tour hours.

Click here for the #insidedowntown tour page

 

Tick Tock Tick Tock… so says the Inside Downtown Tour Clock!

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It’s too late to get Inside Downtown Tour tickets mailed to you.   Fortunately it’s NOT too late to get advance tickets – but time is running out!  Can’t mail them, but we will just hold them for you at the tour headquarters, Rochester Contemporary Art Center at 137 East Avenue. Make it your first tour stop on Friday night between 5 pm and 8:30 or Saturday between 10:30 am and 4 pm.  You can purchase those money-saving beauties by clicking here, coming to our office between 9 am and 4 pm Monday through Thursday at 133 South Fitzhugh Street in Corn Hill, or going to Parkleigh at 215 Park Avenue.

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What about tickets the days of the tour?  Time may be running out for those tickets as well!  Last year’s tour sold out on the second tour day and, so far, the tickets are flying out the door faster than in 2013.  We DO plan to have tickets for sale at the Rochester Contemporary Art Center, and we will do our best to post information prominently on our webpage, if we completely sell out.  We will certainly have tickets available Friday night, and chances are a handful left on Saturday.

Brunch

But why tempt fate?  Order in advance, and relax over that pre-tour Friday cocktail or Saturday morning brunch knowing you’re about to embark on an amazing tour.

We also have a last minute, under the wire update on the tour.  Two additional apartments have been added – one of the tenants had been traveling and was not able to commit until returning to Rochester.  The tenant is an artist, and his apartment is an incredible treat – a penthouse filled with original works.  Don’t miss it!

>>Follow this link to get your tickets in advance!

Posted by Cindy Boyer, Director of Public Programs

Tour details: East Ave & E. Main St. | Friday September 12  5:30 to 8:30 pm |Saturday, September 13 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Advance tickets are $22. Landmark members may purchase $18 advance tickets from Landmark Society only, online or by phone at (585)546-7029 x11.  If tickets are available the days of the tour they will be $25 for all, sold at Tour HQ, Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo).

After you purchase your tickets, invite your friends and family to attend the tour too-use the hashtag #insidedowntown on social media!

>>Follow this link to get your tickets in advance!