The Landmark Society 2014 Preservation Awards

Join us on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. for one of the most anticipated events of the year:  The Landmark Society’s 2014 Annual Awards.  This special ceremony will take place in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the handsomely restored Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street.  Built between 1885 and 1889 as the Federal Court House and Post Office, this iconic  building was rehabilitated in the late 1970s after many years of neglect and re-opened in 1978 as the new City Hall.  The effort to revitalize this once-vacant building received major support and guidance from The Landmark Society and has been honored with several major awards over the years.

A highlight of the calendar year, the Awards Ceremony will precede the Society’s Annual Jubilee celebration, scheduled one week later on Sunday, November 23.  The Awards are given to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area that have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, public buildings, historic properties, and landscapes.

This event is free and open to the public. Check back, we will be announcing winners in anticipation of the event!

 

Historic Landscape Award: Rochester Public Market

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Historic Landscape Award recognizes and encourages the preservation, restoration and stewardship of historically significant landscapes in our 9-county region.

Rochester Public Market
280 North Union Street, city of Rochester

Image courtesy of Renaissance Hotels

Image courtesy of Renaissance Hotels

Located on this site since 1905, this City-owned market continues to play a vital role in both the Marketview Heights neighborhood and the greater Rochester community, at large. One of the most  popular and vital gathering places for retail shopping, the market campus and buildings have undergone a major rehabilitation over the past decade, an on-going project coordinated by the City of Rochester. While maintaining the historic buildings, structures and brick paving, there has been building rehabilitation, expanded retail space and extensive site improvements. This revitalization has extended out into the surrounding neighborhood, as well, creating a destination that is used and appreciated by thousands of local residents throughout the year.

Craftsman Award: Michael Dube

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

Craftsman Award

Michael Dube –  Plaster & Stucco Specialist
Palmyra, New York

Image courtesy of Andy Olenick

Image courtesy of Andy Olenick

With experience extending over more than five decades, master craftsman Michael Dube is an artisan whose careful repair of historic stucco and plaster work has enhanced some of the most important buildings in our region. A native of Maine, where he received his initial training, Mr. Dube opened his local workshop in 1972. Projects have included flat plaster and stucco restoration on interiors and exteriors, as well as the casting and repair of decorative plaster details that were damaged or no longer extant. In addition to dozens of residential projects at area homes dating from the early 1800’s to the mid-20th century, Mr. Dube’s work can be seen at the Susan B. Anthony House, Genesee Country Village and Museum, Penfield’s Dayton Corners School House, Corpus Christi and First Universalist churches,  and the Hervey Ely House headquarters of the D.A.R. in Corn Hill.

Special Citation: Portageville Chapel Organ Retreat

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

A Special Citation provides recognition for projects that do not fit into other categories or recognizes outstanding individual or group accomplishments in the field of historic preservation.

Portageville Chapel Organ Retreat
Route 19, hamlet of Portageville, Wyoming County

Portageville Chapel Image courtesy of the Portageville Chapel

Portageville Chapel                                                             Image courtesy of the Portageville Chapel

Located in a magnificent setting adjacent to Letchworth State Park, the Portageville Chapel organ retreat was created to provide a place of rest and renewal for professional organists. Originally built as a Universalist church in 1841, this handsome Greek Revival building continued as a house of worship into the early 1980s. Local residents then campaigned to save the vacant building, which was converted into a retail shop. By the 1990s, retail use ceased, but merchandise remained in the building through the next twenty years.

In 2007, organist and Wyoming Co. native Tim Smith formed a not-for-profit organization, which purchased the property and began its restoration as an organ retreat. Overgrown trees, deteriorated structures and other debris were removed from the site. Funded, in part, by a grant from the NYS Office of Historic Preservation, the extensive rehabilitation project included structural repairs, a new roof, a modern electrical system and restored Gothic window sash. The original pews were returned to the sanctuary and a modern pipe organ installed. An adjacent house was purchased and refurbished to provide accommodations for visiting musicians. Listed in the National and State Registers of Historic Places, the restored Portageville Chapel organ retreat is unique in the U.S. and provides a new and exciting use for an important landmark in the Genesee Valley.

Newly installed modern pipe organ.

Newly installed modern pipe organ.                 Image Courtesy of the Landmark Society

Organ and original pews Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

Organ and original pews                                     Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

 

Special Citation: Stantec Consulting Services

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

A Special Citation provides recognition for projects that do not fit into other categories or recognizes outstanding individual or group accomplishments in the field of historic preservation.

Stantec Consulting Services
61 Commercial Street, city of Rochester

stantec
Image courtesy of Stantec Consulting Services

This historic c. 1890 industrial building was originally designed as the power house for the Rochester Railway Company. At  the facility – one of the first of its kind – electricity was generated by harnessing the power of the Genesee River as it was diverted through Brown’s Race. By the late 20th century, the building became a storage space, manufacturing facility, then two short-lived entertainment venues.

Norry Management Company acquired the building in 2006, and together with Stantec Consulting Services, they rehabilitated this signature property using the Federal and State Investment Tax Credit program available for the renovation of income-producing buildings listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Working with the NYS Office of Historic Preservation and the Rochester Preservation Board, the principles created a project that restored historic details, but also created dramatic new work spaces in the spacious interior. Window openings, long in-filled with brick, were reactivated, allowing daylighting throughout the interior. The design also included sustainable technologies and practices which earned LEED Certified status.

Special Citation: St. Januarius Catholic Church

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

A Special Citation provides recognition for projects that do not fit into other categories or recognizes outstanding individual or group accomplishments in the field of historic preservation.

St. Januarius Catholic Church
Main St., village of Naples, Ontario County

Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

We honor the parish of Our Lady of the Lakes for the care of St. Januarius Catholic Church in the village of Naples. Established in 1876 by local residents of mostly German heritage, this congregation commissioned Rochester architect James Johnson to create their present house of worship in 1965-’66.

One of Johnson’s earliest projects to use cast concrete panels fabricated on-site, the church features bold design and innovative construction. The signature windows are formed by dozens of round openings in the concrete panels. Each opening is set with a roundel of brightly colored glass, through which light streams into the main sanctuary to dramatic effect during daylight hours.

Image courtesy of the landmark society

Image courtesy of the landmark society

A sensitive rehabilitation of the church was completed in 2011 by LaBella Associates, which included a newly designed altar, improved accessibility and energy conservation features. One of the most photographed churches in the region, this remarkable building is an important example of Mid-Century Modern design in western New York.

Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

 

Special Achievement Award: Jean France

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Special Achievement Award recognizes accomplishments that have occurred over a lengthy period of time.

Jean France

Jean France
Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

Architectural historian, preservation consultant, educator, researcher, lecturer, author, and advocate for  our historic built environment, Jean France has been an enthusiastic and effective community leader for over six decades. A native of Cleveland, this Oberlin College alumna arrived in Rochester during the era of the Federal Urban Renewal programs, when the importance of our historic architecture was not recognized and many important buildings were lost.

Over the next decades, Jean’s exceptional outreach through a variety of activities would help to change those community attitudes. Her extensive knowledge of American architecture was shared through classes she taught at the University of Rochester for over three decades, as well as her long-time service as a trustee and committee member of The Landmark Society of Western New York. She has written extensively about local architecture and historic preservation for CITY newspaper and other publications. Jean’s  study of the Arts-and Crafts movement, in particular architects Claude Bragdon and Harvey Ellis, has been a focus of  her research and writing since the 1960’s.

For over a decade, Jean organized the Memorial Art Gallery’s popular “Architecture, the Art We Live In” lecture series, where noted speakers presented engaging programs about the built environment. Jean’s expertise in architecture and design has benefited communities such as Rochester, Perinton, and Pittsford, where she served as consultant to their municipal preservation boards. She was the founding chair of the Town of Perinton’s Historic Preservation Commission. Most recently, she was a principal consultant for the restoration of the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Edward Boynton House on East Boulevard in Rochester. An individual with a passion for architecture and the built environment, Jean France has been a tireless advocate for this community’s historic resources for over six decades.

Historic Home Award: 625 Mt. Hope Avenue

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Historic Home Award is given to owners of private residences for their continued care of and commitment to the preservation of an architecturally significant house over a minimum of seven years.

625 Mt. Hope Avenue
Rochester, New York
Owners: Rosemary Janofsky

625_MtHope (4)

Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

Located in the city’s Mt. Hope/Highland Historic District, this handsome, 19th-century house was originally built in 1839 by James Hawks and subsequently purchased by horticultural pioneer George Ellwanger in 1867. It was enlarged at that time by architect Andrew J. Warner and again in the early 20th century by his son, J. Foster Warner. The Ellwanger family continued here until 1982, when George’s granddaughter, Helen, the founder of The Landmark Society of Western New York, bequeathed the property to that organization. The house was then rehabilitated as a residence and country inn.

After a long period of vacancy, the property was purchased by Ms. Janofsky in 2006. An extensive and challenging rehabilitation of the house and carriage barn was completed.  As part of this exceptional project, new roofs were installed, structural elements were repaired, a new and expanded front porch was constructed, and paint colors were selected to enhance the picturesque design of the historic buildings. Today, the house serves as both a private residence and the Ellwanger Estate bed-and-breakfast inn.

 

Historic Landscape Award: New York State Fish Hatchery

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Historic Landscape Award recognizes and encourages the preservation, restoration and stewardship of historically significant landscapes in our 9-county region.

New York State Fish Hatchery
16 North Street, village of Caledonia, Livingston County

NYS Fish Hatchery Caledonia                                                                             Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

This year is the 150th anniversary of the New York State Fish Hatchery in Caledonia, a milestone for this remarkable property, which is the oldest fish hatchery in the Western hemisphere. Established in 1864 by Rochesterian Seth Green, the hatchery is located on Oatka Creek, renowned for its exceptional qualities and conditions that make it ideal for the propagation of trout. Known as the “father of fish culture,” Green gained a world-wide reputation as a pioneer in both aquaculture and conservation.

Now operated by the New York State Department of Conservation, the hatchery features a picturesque campus that retains its historic buildings, as well as modern facilities.  It is open to the public year ‘round and maintains a schedule of activities focused on the breeding of brown and rainbow trout. Soon to be listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, the hatchery is a unique property whose historical, cultural, and scientific importance extends far beyond our region.

Award of Merit: North Wayneport Road Bridge

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Award of Merit is for the sympathetic rehabilitation of an historic  building or structure in our 9-county region completed within the past two years.

North Wayneport Road  Bridge:                                                                                   North Wayneport Road, town of Macedon, Wayne County

N. Wayneport Rd bridge                                                          Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

Located on the Erie Canal in the tiny hamlet of Wayneport, just over the Monroe County line, the North Wayneport Road Bridge was built in 1912 as part of the massive Barge Canal project, which updated and expanded that historic waterway. The single-span bridge was erected by the Owego Bridge Company of Owego, New York and features a variation of the Baltimore (aka Petit) style, through-truss design.

Originally used by horse-drawn vehicles and early 20th-century motorcars, the bridge now accommodates a steady volume of local traffic, in combination with the hikers, cyclists, and tourists, who travel the adjacent Erie Canal Towpath Trail.  The recent rehabilitation project was completed by the New York State Department of Transportation.  Replacement of major elements such as floor beams, grate decking, truss bearings and gusset plates, as well as painting the floor system and lower sections was completed.  An increasingly rare example of truss bridge design, the North Wayneport Road Bridge is an important contributing element in the historic Erie Canal system, which has been listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places.