Good news for Five to Revive

Hillside Cemetery and Chapel receives funding from NYS REDC

Last week, we had fantastic news about one of our 2014 Five to Revive properties, the Hillside Cemetery and Chapel in Orleans County: the Town of Clarendon was awarded $126,210 from the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council to help fund much-needed repairs to the Cemetery Chapel. Funding will come through the NYS Office of Parks Recreation & Historic Preservation.

HillsideChapel_Summer2015_02

Since its inclusion on the Five to Revive, Landmark staff have been working with local preservation advocates and Town of Clarendon officials to find funding for repairs to the Chapel, to draw attention to the site, and to find creative, economically viable new uses for the building. The grant project will restore the non-denominational chapel and help repurpose it for new, public uses. Anticipated uses include: concerts, historical and art exhibits, and lectures.

Our hats go off to the preservationists (most notably Orleans County resident, Erin Anheier who was also instrumental in saving the Clarendon Stone Store) who have spearheaded this effort. Irreplaceable historic resources like this could not be saved without their hard work and determination.

For more information, check out Tom Rivers’ article about the grant at the Orleans Hub.

Cattaraugus County Memorial & Historical Building

Two weeks ago, Landmark staff and preservation advocates with the group Citizens Advocating Memorial Preservation (CAMP) were blindsided by an announcement from the Department of Public Works Committee of the Cattaraugus County legislature informing us that there would be no further discussion about reuse of the Memorial Building and that a resolution for demolition would be put before the full legislature the following week.

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Luckily, CAMPers were able to quickly rally the support of some key legislators and the vote to demolish was defeated last week. For more information, check out these two articles by Rick Miller in the Olean Times Herald.

County pulls the plug on C.A.M.P. preservation efforts

Lawmakers grant reprieve to Civil War Monument

As one of our current Five to Revive, Landmark staff are actively working with CAMP members to save this unique building that was constructed to honor veterans of the Civil War. Our Preservation Grant Fund helped fund a preservation plan for the property and we continue to advocate for a thorough and well-reasoned exploration of economically viable new uses.

We are hopeful that the County will be open to considering alternatives. In the meantime, it is important that County legislators hear from their constituents that this is an important issue. If you are a resident of Cattaraugus County, please reach out to your legislators and let them know that you don’t want to see taxpayer money used to demolish an irreplaceable veterans war memorial. If you know someone who is a resident of Cattaraugus County, please encourage them to contact their County representatives.

Wollensack Optical Company building on the market

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This former factory building on Hudson Avenue in the city of Rochester has just recently hit the market. Although the building has been long-vacant, it is ripe for adaptive reuse. It is listed with Michael Quinn of Mission Commercial Realty. Click here to see the listing.

Bash on the Bridges: Genesee Valley Park

Celebrate the historic pedestrian bridges in Rochester’s Genesee Valley Park. Live music, lawn games, drinks and light refreshments. Short, guided walking tours of the Park and the handsome concrete arch bridges, built in 1916 and 1919 and designed by the influential Olmsted Brothers firm, will depart at 6:45 p.m. Rain or shine! Please RSVP.

The Preservation League of New York State and The Landmark Society of Western New York will host a celebration of the three Olmsted pedestrian bridges in Rochester’s Genesee Valley Park on Thursday, July 23 from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. >>Click here to register. 

The event will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Canalside Shelter on the east side of Genesee Valley Park (see aerial image below) with live music, lawn games, drinks, and light refreshments. Short, guided walking tours of the Park and the handsome concrete arch bridges, which were built in 1916 and 1919 and designed by the influential Olmsted Brothers firm, will depart at 6:45 p.m.

GVP Map Graphic 3

The pedestrian bridges link regional and statewide trails including the Erie Canalway and are functional and historic assets. Limited funding, deferred maintenance, and uncertainty about rehabilitation responsibilities have put these bridges at risk.

Casual dress and sturdy shoes are recommended for the walking tour. Light refreshments will be served. Partygoers are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs and lawn games.

The Preservation League of New York State named the three bridges to its list of the Empire State’s most threatened historic resources, Seven to Save, in 2014.

“Since 1999, Seven to Save has mobilized community leaders and decision-makers to take action when historic resources are threatened,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “A Seven to Save designation from the League delivers technical assistance, fosters increased media coverage and public awareness, and opens the door to grant assistance for endangered properties.”

In late 2011, the New York State Department of Transportation (Region Four) released a Conditions Assessment and Concept Study for the three bridges which identified structural deficiencies, erosion issues, and other concerns. Even without a study, the deterioration of concrete surfaces and details are obvious. The report identified five treatment alternatives, three of which call for replacement.

The event will celebrate the efforts of local stakeholders such as the City of Rochester, Monroe County, the NYS Department of Transportation and The Landmark Society of Western New York, to devise a plan for stewardship of these bridges.

“These Erie Canal pedestrian bridges are a unique and highly visible feature in one of our most important historic landscapes, Genesee Valley Park,” said Wayne Goodman, Executive Director of the Landmark Society. “The park was originally conceived as a major component  of the Rochester park system, one of only four park systems in the country designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, one of America’s most prominent and visionary landscape architects. We invite neighbors of Genesee Valley Park and all Rochesterians to join us in celebrating and drawing attention to these remarkable assets.”

There is no cost for the event, but space is limited and reservations are required. Please register using the links on this page or call 585-546-7029 x11. The event will be held rain or shine.

The Canalside Shelter is located adjacent to the easternmost of the three Olmsted pedestrian bridges. To get to the shelter and the bridges, enter the Park from Elmwood Avenue. Follow the park road (Moore Road) and just before crossing the Erie Canal, make the first right towards the shelter parking lot. Cyclists may access the bridges by following the Genesee Riverway Trail on the east side of the river. Those taking the Riverway Trail from the west should make a left and cross the river just after the Genesee Waterways Center.

>>Click here to register.

 

Bash on the Bridges

Join The Landmark Society and the Preservation League of New York State as we celebrate the Olmsted Pedestrian Bridges in Genesee Valley Park!

>>Click here to RSVP.

From easternmost bridge to center bridge

The Preservation League of New York State and The Landmark Society of Western New York will host a celebration of the three Olmsted pedestrian bridges in Rochester’s Genesee Valley Park on Thursday, July 23 from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. The event will begin at the Canalside Shelter on the east side of Genesee Valley Park with live music, lawn games, drinks, and light refreshments (see below for aerial view with location details).

Short, guided walking tours of the Park and the handsome concrete arch bridges, which were built in 1916 and 1919 and designed by the influential Olmsted Brothers firm, will depart at 6:45 p.m.

The pedestrian bridges link regional and statewide trails including the Erie Canalway and are functional and historic assets. Limited funding, deferred maintenance, and uncertainty about rehabilitation responsibilities have put these bridges at risk.

Casual dress and sturdy shoes are recommended for the walking tour. Light refreshments will be served. Partygoers are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs and lawn games.

The Preservation League of New York State named the three bridges to its list of the Empire State’s most threatened historic resources, Seven to Save, in 2014.

“Since 1999, Seven to Save has mobilized community leaders and decision-makers to take action when historic resources are threatened,” said Jay DiLorenzo, President of the Preservation League. “A Seven to Save designation from the League delivers technical assistance, fosters increased media coverage and public awareness, and opens the door to grant assistance for endangered properties.”

In late 2011, the New York State Department of Transportation (Region Four) released a Conditions Assessment and Concept Study for the three bridges which identified structural deficiencies, erosion issues, and other concerns. Even without a study, the deterioration of concrete surfaces and details are obvious. The report identified five treatment alternatives, three of which call for replacement.

The event will celebrate the efforts of local stakeholders such as the City of Rochester, Monroe County, the NYS Department of Transportation and The Landmark Society of Western New York, to devise a plan for stewardship of these bridges.

“These Erie Canal pedestrian bridges are a unique and highly visible feature in one of our most important historic landscapes, Genesee Valley Park,” said Wayne Goodman, Executive Director of the Landmark Society. “The park was originally conceived as a major component of the Rochester park system, one of only four park systems in the country designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, one of America’s most prominent and visionary landscape architects. We invite neighbors of Genesee Valley Park and all Rochesterians to join us in celebrating and drawing attention to these remarkable assets.”

There is no cost for the event, but space is limited and reservations are required. The event will be held rain or shine. >>Click here to RSVP.

The Canalside Shelter is located adjacent to the easternmost of the three Olmsted pedestrian bridges. To get to the shelter and the bridges, enter the Park from Elmwood Avenue. Follow the park road (Moore Road) and just before crossing the Erie Canal, make the first right towards the shelter parking lot. Cyclists may access the bridges by following the Genesee Riverway Trail on the east side of the river. Those taking the Riverway Trail from the west should make a left and cross the river just after the Genesee Waterways Center.

GVP Map Graphic 3

Ellwanger Garden Special Open Hours during Lilac Festival

2008-5-6-LKZ-Ellwanger-11

While you’re exploring the lilacs at Highland Park, escape the crowds and stroll over to the Ellwanger Garden on Mt. Hope Avenue.

Free admission, donations accepted.

What is the Lilac Festival Connection?
The altruism of George Ellwanger and Patrick Barry changed the face of Rochester. Their gift of 20 choice acres prodded the city to form the Parks Department in 1888. The 20 acres were the start of Highland Park, location of the world famous “Lilac Festival” each May.

The success of the Rochester nursery trade, as exemplified by the Mt. Hope Nursery, earned Rochester the title “The Flower City.” The Lilac Festival maintains the heritage of that name, and Ellwanger Garden gives you the chance to experience the inspiration of that heritage.

Ellwanger Garden Special Open Hours during Lilac Festival

2008-5-6-LKZ-Ellwanger-11

While you’re exploring the lilacs at Highland Park, escape the crowds and stroll over to the Ellwanger Garden on Mt. Hope Avenue.

Free admission, donations accepted.

What is the Lilac Festival Connection?
The altruism of George Ellwanger and Patrick Barry changed the face of Rochester. Their gift of 20 choice acres prodded the city to form the Parks Department in 1888. The 20 acres were the start of Highland Park, location of the world famous “Lilac Festival” each May.

The success of the Rochester nursery trade, as exemplified by the Mt. Hope Nursery, earned Rochester the title “The Flower City.” The Lilac Festival maintains the heritage of that name, and Ellwanger Garden gives you the chance to experience the inspiration of that heritage.

Ellwanger Garden Special Open Hours during Lilac Festival

2008-5-6-LKZ-Ellwanger-11

While you’re exploring the lilacs at Highland Park, escape the crowds and stroll over to the Ellwanger Garden on Mt. Hope Avenue.

Free admission, donations accepted.

What is the Lilac Festival Connection?
The altruism of George Ellwanger and Patrick Barry changed the face of Rochester. Their gift of 20 choice acres prodded the city to form the Parks Department in 1888. The 20 acres were the start of Highland Park, location of the world famous “Lilac Festival” each May.

The success of the Rochester nursery trade, as exemplified by the Mt. Hope Nursery, earned Rochester the title “The Flower City.” The Lilac Festival maintains the heritage of that name, and Ellwanger Garden gives you the chance to experience the inspiration of that heritage.

Ellwanger Garden Special Open Hours during Lilac Festival

2008-5-6-LKZ-Ellwanger-11

 

While you’re exploring the lilacs at Highland Park, escape the crowds and stroll over to the Ellwanger Garden on Mt. Hope Avenue.

Free admission, donations accepted.

What is the Lilac Festival Connection?
The altruism of George Ellwanger and Patrick Barry changed the face of Rochester. Their gift of 20 choice acres prodded the city to form the Parks Department in 1888. The 20 acres were the start of Highland Park, location of the world famous “Lilac Festival” each May.

The success of the Rochester nursery trade, as exemplified by the Mt. Hope Nursery, earned Rochester the title “The Flower City.” The Lilac Festival maintains the heritage of that name, and Ellwanger Garden gives you the chance to experience the inspiration of that heritage.

Olmsted Birthday Bash on the Bridge

Celebrate the 193rd Birthday of Frederick Law Olmsted with music, food and fun!

Rochester will celebrate the birthday of Frederick Law Olmsted, revered as a visionary landscape architect and designer of several of Rochester’s majestic parks on Sunday, April 26.

The Olmsted Birthday Bash on the Bridge will run from 2 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. on the pedestrian bridge between Seneca and Maplewood Parks. (Rain location: Wegman Lodge in Seneca Park).

The afternoon features refreshments, music, sidewalk-chalk drawings and a display of historic Seneca and Maplewood Park pictures from the Albert Stone collection. The event is sponsored by the Friends and Neighbors of Seneca Park, Highland Park Conservancy and The Landmark Society of Western New York with additional support from Hart’s Local Grocers.

Parking is available at Maplewood Park (off Bridgeview Dr.) on the west side of the River or in Seneca Park (near the playground) on the east side. For those wishing to travel on two wheels, a group bicycle ride will depart from the Roundhouse at Genesee Valley Park at 12:00p.m. and travel to the Birthday Bash through Highland Park and Maplewood Park before arriving at the bridge.

Rochester is just one of four cities nationwide that boasts an entire park system designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, best known for his design of New York’s Central Park. Olmsted designed Highland, Genesee Valley, and Seneca Parks for Rochester. He and the firm that continued his work after his retirement also designed several parkways and small neighborhood parks.

In 1888, Rochester’s Board of Park Commissioners selected Olmsted to design a network of parks and parkways for the city. Olmsted encouraged the Commissioners to set aside generous amounts of open space as the city’s first major public parks and proposed a system focused on the city’s great natural asset – the dramatic Genesee River in all its glorious variety.

>>Click here for the Google map with exact location and parking

Historic Landscape Award: New York State Fish Hatchery

The Landmark Society’s 2014 Preservation Awards will be presented this year at a special event on Sunday, November 16 at 3:00 p.m. in Rochester’s historic City Hall, the spectacular Richardsonian Romanesque landmark located downtown at 30 Church Street. The Awards are given each year to individuals and organizations in our nine-county area who have made outstanding efforts in the preservation of their homes, historic properties, and landscapes. In anticipation of the upcoming Awards Ceremony we will be featuring some of this year’s award winners.

The Historic Landscape Award recognizes and encourages the preservation, restoration and stewardship of historically significant landscapes in our 9-county region.

New York State Fish Hatchery
16 North Street, village of Caledonia, Livingston County

NYS Fish Hatchery Caledonia                                                                             Image courtesy of the Landmark Society

This year is the 150th anniversary of the New York State Fish Hatchery in Caledonia, a milestone for this remarkable property, which is the oldest fish hatchery in the Western hemisphere. Established in 1864 by Rochesterian Seth Green, the hatchery is located on Oatka Creek, renowned for its exceptional qualities and conditions that make it ideal for the propagation of trout. Known as the “father of fish culture,” Green gained a world-wide reputation as a pioneer in both aquaculture and conservation.

Now operated by the New York State Department of Conservation, the hatchery features a picturesque campus that retains its historic buildings, as well as modern facilities.  It is open to the public year ‘round and maintains a schedule of activities focused on the breeding of brown and rainbow trout. Soon to be listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, the hatchery is a unique property whose historical, cultural, and scientific importance extends far beyond our region.

Discover Silver Lake: 150 Years of Historic Architecture

Join Architectural Historicna Cynthia Howk for a slide talk titled, “Discover Silver Lake: 150 Years of Historic Architecture” on Saturday August 2, 2014, 7pm at Epworth Hall on the Silver Lake Institute campus. This event is free and open to the public.

Silver Lake cottages copy

The slide talk will feature a selection of the wide-ranging historic architecture on/around Silver Lake, which includes residential, commercial, recreational, religious, and agricultural buildings built over the past 150 years. The talk is part of the on-going Summer event series scheduled during July & August at Silver Lake Institute.

 

DIRECTIONS: Silver Lake Institute is located approximately 1 hour southwest of Rochester on the EAST side of Silver Lake. It is immediately south of the village of Perry, Wyoming County. Take Route 39 (Main St.) south, through the village of Perry. At Chapman Road ( approx. 1.5 miles south of the village), turn RIGHT (west) onto Chapman Road. You will see a sign – “Camp Asbury” – at the corner. This intersection is also highly visible, with a Drive-in/restaurant/miniature golf course complex on the NORTHWEST corner of Route 39 & Chapman Rd. Drive west on Chapman Road, towards Silver Lake, and you will come to the main entrance to the Silver Lake Institute campus. Epworth Hall, a large auditorium/meeting center, is on the RIGHT; parking for Epworth Hall is on the adjacent lawn.