Architecture For Lunch: East End/Grove Place

Explore the city’s glamorous East End cultural district in the heart of downtown Rochester. We’ll visit the last remaining Victorian residential district in  Center City, as we stroll through historic Grove Place and discover its quaint 19th-century architecture, whimsical public art, pocket gardens, and dramatic 20th century buildings. One of the city’s most dynamic neighborhoods, the East End has history, art, restaurants, and activities for all ages, interests and appetites!

Meet in front of Christ Church, 141 East Ave.

Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these 20-minute presentations feature information about the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.  Cynthia Howk, Landmark Society staff member and local history expert, will guide interested tour goers from 12:10 to 12:30 p.m.  Architecture for Lunch tours are free and open to the public; held rain or shine, for the most interesting lunch break you’ve ever taken.  Meet Cynthia at 12:10 p.m. on June 12, 19 & 26.

Architecture for Lunch: St. Paul Street Garment District

Meet in front of H.H. Warner Building, 82 St. Paul St.

Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these 20-minute presentations feature information about the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.  Cynthia Howk, Landmark Society staff member and local history expert, will guide interested tour goers from 12:10 to 12:30 p.m.  Architecture for Lunch tours are free and open to the public; held rain or shine, for the most interesting lunch break you’ve ever taken.  Meet Cynthia at 12:10 p.m. on June 12, 19 & 26.

Architecture For Lunch: Four Corners

Come explore the city’s historic “Four Corners” area, where Rochester’s financial, government and banking industries have been headquartered for nearly 200 years. Discover the original 100-Acre Tract purchased by entrepreneur Colonel Nathaniel Rochester, a Maryland resident and founder of our city in the early 1800s. Learn Rochester fascinating early history as a village, its development as an Erie Canal “Boom Town,” and the remarkable collection of historic architecture that’s located in this bustling neighborhood.

Meet at City Hall, 30 Church St (Church St./main entrance)

Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these 20-minute presentations feature information about the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.  Cynthia Howk, Landmark Society staff member and local history expert, will guide interested tour goers from 12:10 to 12:30 p.m.  Architecture for Lunch tours are free and open to the public; held rain or shine, for the most interesting lunch break you’ve ever taken.  Meet Cynthia at 12:10 p.m. on June 12, 19 & 26.

Architecture For Lunch: Eastman Theatre/ Grove Place

Explore the city’s glamorous East End cultural district in the heart of downtown Rochester.  We’ll meet in front of the world-renowned Eastman Theatre/Eastman School of Music,  a gift to the Rochester community in the 1920s from Kodak mogul George Eastman.  We’ll visit the last remaining VIctorian residential district in  Center City, as we stroll historic Grove Place and discover its quaint 19th-century architecture, whimsical public art, pocket gardens, and dramatic 20th century buildings.  One of the city’s most dynamic neighborhoods, the East End has history, art, restaurants, and activities for all ages, interests and appetites!

Meet at Eastman Place plaza, on East Main Street/corner of Gibbs Street, opposite the entrance to the Eastman Theatre.  Paid parking is available in the Main/Scio St. ramp garage, as well as on-street metered parking along Gibbs Street.

Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these 20-minute presentations feature information about the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.  Cynthia Howk, Landmark Society staff member and local history expert, will guide itnerested tour goers from 12:10 to 12:35 p.m.  Architecture for Lunch tours are free and open to the public; held rain or shine, for the most interesting lunch break you’ve ever taken.  Meet Cynthia at 12:10 p.m. on June 13, 20 & 27.

Architecture For Lunch: St. Paul Street Garment District

Explore the city’s historic garment district where clothing, shoes, and ties were manufactured for decades.  From the mid 19th to the mid 20th century, Rochester was world-famous for its quality clothing and shoe products, most of which were produced here in the St. Paul/North Water/Andrews street area immediately next to the Genesee River.  Those remarkable industrial buildings have recently been converted to loft apartments, artist studios, professional offices and trendy restaurants.  Because of  its remarkable history and architecture, most of this neighborhood is listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

Meet in front of The Plaza Apartments, 125 St. Paul Street, on the southwest corner of Andrews Street in downtown Rochester.  Paid parking is available nearby in private lots or  at on-street metered parking.

Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these 20-minute presentations feature information about the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.  Cynthia Howk, Landmark Society staff member and local history expert, will guide itnerested tour goers from 12:10 to 12:35 p.m.  Architecture for Lunch tours are free and open to the public; held rain or shine, for the most interesting lunch break you’ve ever taken.  Meet Cynthia at 12:10 p.m. on June 13, 20 & 27.

Architecture For Lunch: Powers Building/ Four Corners

Come explore the city’s historic “Four Corners” area, where Rochester’s financial, government and banking industries have been headquartered for nearly 200 years. Discover the original 100-Acre Tract purchased by entrepreneur Colonel Nathaniel Rochester, a Maryland resident and founder of our city in the early 1800s.  Learn Rochester fascinating early history as a village, its development as an Erie Canal “Boom Town,” and the remarkable collection of historic architecture that’s located in this bustling neighborhood, including a visit to the interiors of the French-inspired Powers Building and the Italian Renaissance County Office Building.

Powers Building, 16 W. Main Street, city of Rochester.  Enter at W. Main St./front entrance. Parking is nearby in Sister Cities Ramp garage on N. Fitzhugh Street, as well as is paid, on-street parking.

Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these 20-minute presentations feature information about the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.  Cynthia Howk, Landmark Society staff member and local history expert, will guide interested tour goers from 12:10 to 12:35 p.m.  Architecture for Lunch tours are free and open to the public; held rain or shine, for the most interesting lunch break you’ve ever taken.  Meet Cynthia at 12:10 p.m. on June 13, 20 & 27.

Architecture for Lunch is back!

Each Friday in June, our very own Cynthia Howk (Architectural Research Coordinator and walking encyclopedia here at The Landmark Society) leads a quick lunchtime walking tour of a neighborhood in downtown Rochester.Timed to fit in with busy schedules and weekday lunch breaks, these FREE (!) 20 minute tours feature information on the history and architecture of downtown Rochester.

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Last Friday we hit up the Four Corners. Being the hub of business and governmental activity downtown, Four Corners has a big lunchtime crowd and plenty of quick lunch spots (like Pizza Stop, Times Square Cafe, and Shirley’s Island Cuisine, to name a few). Landmark Society staffers Caitlin Meives and Larry Francer, along with our summer intern, opted for a burrito and tacos at Hot Rosita’s and stocked up on caffeine at Boulder Coffee so that we could keep up with Cynthia.

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We then met up with a crowd of about 35 other tour-goers at the Powers Building. From there, we went across the street to the County Office Building, where we all marveled at the 4-story atrium, marble columns and walls, and the elaborate railings.

We ended on Fitzhugh St. at the St. Luke & St. Simon Cyrene Church and the recently rehabbed Free Academy Building.

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So, if you’re an architecture buff or you like looking at pretty, old buildings or if you just want to get out of the office for a few minutes, join us for the last two installments of Architecture for Lunch:

>>Washington Square Park – Friday, June 21

>>Grove Place/East End – Friday, June 28